Unlock user account using OpenAM Forgot Password flow

OpenAM provides “Account Lockout” functionality which can be used to configure various lockout parameters such as failure count, lockout interval etc.

Note that OpenDJ also provides Account Lockout functionality, this article is based on OpenAM Account Lockout policies. Refer this KB article for more differences between OpenAM and OpenDJ lockout polices.

Using OpenAM “Account Lockout” policies, users may get locked out with invalid login attempts. OpenAM offers both Memory and Physical lockouts. Using memory lockout, users get unlocked automatically after specified duration.

Many deployments use “Physical lockout” due to security requirements. When this lockout mode is used then there should be some Self-service flow so that user can unlock themselves. Why not use OpenAM forgot password self-service flow ?

OpenAM forgot password allows user to reset password after successfully completing various stages (such as KBA, email confirmation, reCaptcha etc). Unfortunately, the problem is that the account is not unlocked when this flow is used. There is already an open RFE for this issue.

Solution

Versions used for this implementation: OpenAM 13.5, OpenDJ 3.5
One of the solution can include extending out of the box OpenAM’s forgot password self-service flow by adding custom stage to unlock user’s account:
  • Implement ForgottenPasswordConfigProviderExt to include account unlock stage.
  • Implement unlock custom stage
  • Extend selfServiceExt.xml to include custom provider.

Deploy

  • Build the custom stage by using maven.
  • Delete all instances of User Self-Service from all realms.
  • Remove existing selfService
./ssoadm delete-svc --adminid amadmin --password-file /tmp/pwd.txt -s selfService
  • Restart OpenAM
  • Register custom selfService
  • Restart OpenAM
./ssoadm create-svc --adminid amadmin --password-file /tmp/pwd.txt --xmlfile ~/softwares/selfServiceExt.xml
  • Add User Self-Service to specified realm and enable forgot password flow.

Testing

  1. Lock user by authenticating using wrong password till user is locked out.
  2. Follow forgot password flow to reset password and unlock account.
  3. Try authenticating again with new password. This should succeed.

This blog post was first published @ theinfinitelooper.blogspot.com, included here with permission.

ForgeRock Self-Service Custom Stage

Introduction

A while ago I blogged an article describing how to add custom stages to the ForgeRock IDM self-service config.  At the time I used the sample custom stage available from the ForgeRock Commons Self-Service code base.  I left it as a task for the reader to build their own stage!  However, I recently had cause to build a custom stage for a proof of concept I was working on.

It’s for IDM v5 and I’ve detailed the steps here.

Business Logic

The requirement for the stage was to validate that a registering user had ownership of the provided phone number.  The phone number could be either a mobile or a landline.  The approach taken was to use Twilio (a 3rd party) to send out either an SMS to a mobile, or text-to-speech to a landline.  The content of the message is a code based on HOTP.

Get the code for the module

https://stash.forgerock.org/users/andrew.potter/repos/twilio-stage/browse

Building the module

Follow the instructions in README.md

After deploying the .jar file you must restart IDM for the bundle to be correctly recognised.

The module is targeted for IDMv5.  It uses the maven repositories to get the binary dependencies.
See this article in order to access the ForgeRock ‘private-releases’ maven repo:
https://backstage.forgerock.com/knowledge/kb/article/a74096897

It also uses appropriate pom.xml directives to ensure the final .jar file is packaged as an OSGi bundle so that it can be dropped into IDM

Technical details

The code consists of a few files.  The first two in this list a the key files for any stage.  They implement the necessary interfaces for a stage.  The remaining files are the specific business logic for this stage.

  • TwilioStageConfig.java.  This class manages reading the configuration data from the configuration file.  It simply represents each configuration item for the stage as properties of the class.
  • TwilioStage.java.  This is main orchestration file for the stage.  It copes with both registration and password reset scenarios.  It manages the ‘state’ of the flow within this stage and generates the appropriate callbacks to user, but relies on the other classes to do the real code management work.  If you want to learn about the way a ‘stage’ works then this is file to consider in detail.
  • HOTPAlgorithm.java.  This is taken from the OATH Initiative work and is unchanged by me.  It is a java class to generate a code based on the HOTP algorithm.
  • TwilioService.java. This class manages the process of sending the code.  It generates the code then decides whether to send it using SMS or TTS.  (In the UK, all mobile phone numbers start 07… so it’s very simple logic for my purpose!)  This class also provides a method to validate the code entered by the user.
  • TwilioUtil.java.  The class provides the utility functions that interact directly with the Twilio APIs for sending either an SMS or TTS

 

Configuration

There are also two sample config files for registration and password reset.  You should include the JSON section relating to this class in your self-service configuration files for IDM.
For example:

        {
“class” : “org.forgerock.selfservice.twilio.TwilioStageConfig”,
“codeValidityDuration” : “6000”,
“codeLength” : “5”,
“controlUrl” : “http://twimlets.com/message?Message%5B0%5D=Hello%20Please%20enter%20the%20following%20one%20time%20code”,
“fromPhone” : “+441412803033”,
“accountSid” : “<Enter accountSid>”,
“tokenId” : “<Enter tokenId>”,
“telephoneField” : “telephoneNumber”,
“skipSend” : false
},

Most configuration items should be self explanatory.  However, the ‘skipSend’ option is worthy of special note.  This, when true, will cause the stage to avoid calling the Twilio APIs and instead return the code as part of the callback data.  This means that if you’re using the OOTB UI then the ‘placeholder’ HTML attribute of the input box will tell you the code to enter.  This is really useful for testing this stage if you don’t have access to a Twilio account as this also ignores the Twilio account specific configuration items.

Of course, now you need to deploy it as per my previous article!

This blog post was first published @ yaunap.blogspot.no, included here with permission from the author.

ForgeRock welcomes Nabil Maynard

Late welcome to Nabil Maynard who joined the ForgeRock documentation team this past Monday.

Nabil has started working on the identity management documentation. He’s digging into his new full-time job as a writer.

Nabil brings solid technical experience and understanding of how server software works, having been a QA professional for years at places like Dropbox. So much of writing good documentation for ForgeRock software depends on throughly understanding what the software does, how it can be broken, and what you should do to make it work correctly. Nabil’s contributions will surely help you get deeper into ForgeRock’s identity management software.


ForgeRock welcomes Gina Cariaga

Late welcome to Gina Cariaga who joined the ForgeRock documentation team this spring.

Gina has strong experience writing about access management and directory services. Her formal background in training, mixed with her hands-on success with the kind of documentation we do at ForgeRock make a great combination.

Gina’s initial work at ForgeRock has included putting together a guide to getting started with the ForgeRock platform for IoT architects and developers. Gina is continuing to write on using ForgeRock’s identity and access management capabilities in the IoT space, and much more.


Save greenbacks on Google Container Engine using autoscaling and preemptible VMs

There is an awesome new feature on Google Container Engine (GKE) that lets you combine autoscaling, node pools and preemptible VMs to save big $!

The basic idea is to create a small cluster with an inexpensive VM type that will run 7×24. This primary node can be used for critical services that should not be rescheduled to another pod. A good example would be a Jenkins master server. Here is an example of how to create the cluster:

gcloud alpha container clusters create $CLUSTER 
  --network "default" --num-nodes 1 
  --machine-type  ${small} --zone $ZONE 
  --disk-size 50

Now here is the money saver trick:  A second node pool is added to the cluster. This node pool is configured to auto-scale from one node up to a maximum. This additional node pool uses preemptible VMs. These are VMs that can be taken away at any time if Google needs the capacity, but in exchange you get dirt cheap images. For example, running a 4 core VM with 15GB of RAM for a month comes in under $30.

This second pool is perfect for containers that can survive a restart or migration to a new node. Jenkins slaves would be a good candidate.

Here is an example of adding the node pool to the cluster you created above:

gcloud alpha container node-pools create $NODEPOOL --cluster $CLUSTER --zone $ZONE 
    --machine-type ${medium} --preemptible --disk-size 50 
    --enable-autoscaling --min-nodes=1 --max-nodes=4

That node pool will scale down to a single VM if the cluster is not busy, and scale up to a maximum of 4 nodes.

If your VM gets preempted (and it will at least once every 24 hours),  the pods running on that node will be rescheduled onto a new node created by the auto-scaler.

Container engine assigns a label to nodes which you can use for scheduling. For example, to ensure you Jenkins Master does not get put on a preemptible node, you can add the following annotation to your Pod Spec:

apiVersion: v1kind: Podspec:  nodeSelector:    !cloud.google.com/gke-preemptible
apiVersion: v1kind: Podspec:  nodeSelector:    !cloud.google.com/gke-preemptible
nodeSelector:    !cloud.google.com/gke-preemptible

See https://cloud.google.com/container-engine/docs/preemptible-vm for the details.

This blog post was first published @ warrenstrange.blogspot.ca, included here with permission.