A Beginners Guide to OpenIDM – Part 6 – Provisioning to Active Directory

Last time we looked at configuring user registration. So now we have our users? How do we get them into our other systems? For example a user directory, in this case Active Directory (AD) ? In this blog we will take a look at configuring OpenIDM provisioning, which consists of synchronisation to AD and reconciliation from AD. We will collect […]

It’s The Little Things – Part 1

Since I began working with the ForgeRock technology I have been impressed by how much you can do with it in a very short time and from what I have seen this is really underpinned by an philosophy of developer friendliness. There are lots of small features throughout the platform that are solely there to make life for implementors and developers easier.

In this series I wanted to take the opportunity to call out some of these little things that can make a big difference to your day to day experience.

Simulated Attribute Mapping

One of my favourite features in OpenIDM. Say you need to create provisioning integration with a target system. More often than not you need to manipulate or transform source attributes to achieve this.

Below you can see I have created a mapping to Active Directory in OpenIDM. This is a fairly common requirement that comes up time and again. Among other attributes, when you create an Active Directory account you need to define a Distinguished Name (DN).

I have configured the following script to generate a DN:

This is fairly simple, it just takes the userName of the user in OpenIDM and appends the rest of the desired DN as a fixed string. This is all fairly standard stuff. What is really useful, is that I can simulate the output of my DN transformation before I actually provision any accounts. To do this you just need to select an existing OpenIDM user using the Sample Source feature:

You can now see what the target output will actually look like for a given user. This is a really handy timesaver if you need to write complex mappings and enables you to quickly get a feel whether or not your transformation is correct before you have to go back and forth with failed provisioning operations against Active Directory.

This blog post was first published @ http://identity-implementation.blogspot.no/, included here with permission from the author.

ForgeRock Full Stack Configuration

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

If you’re in a hurry to know what each of the ForgeRock Identity Platform Components is meant to do, try the Full Stack Configuration. In just over fifteen minutes, you’ll see:

– Installation of ForgeRock OpenDJ
– Deployment of ForgeRock OpenAM
– Configuration of OpenDJ as an Identity Repository in ForgeRock OpenAM
– Installation of ForgeRock OpenIDM
– Configuring OpenDJ as External Resource in OpenIDM
– Running a reconciliation in OpenIDM from OpenDJ
– Provisioning a User from OpenIDM to OpenDJ
– Using OpenAM as the Authentication Module for OpenIDM

With a much awaited weekend around the corner, I couldn’t really get over the laziness to create a better illustration than the one below to help visualize what’s mentioned above.

ForgeRockFullStack

Please watch it, if you have some time. Enjoy!

Thanks: ForgeRock Product Documentation

Configuring Roles in ForgeRock OpenIDM 4

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

Merry Christmas!

For those interested to know how to configure Roles in ForgeRock OpenIDM, here’s my Christmas gift. A video at the end of this post will walk you through the installation of both ForgeRock OpenIDM and ForgeRock OpenDJ, configure the latter as an external resource in OpenIDM, performing reconciliation to bring in users from OpenDJ to OpenIDM. That’s not it, because all of that I’ve shown you earlier as well. Then, what’s more? Here it is:

OpenIDMRoles
So we go on and create Roles in OpenIDM, which has Managed Assignments that in turn has Attributes associated with an external resource (ForgeRock OpenDJ). So when a Role is assigned to a user in OpenIDM, based on the value of Attribute that is attached to the Role, the user will be subscribed to a group in the OpenDJ. If it sounds confusing,please don’t waste time reading it again, instead watch the video below, it’ll all be crystal clear.

Enjoy!

Provisioning Users to PostgreSQL Database Table Using ForgeRock OpenIDM

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

This one is rather uncomplicated. ForgeRock OpenIDM does provisioning well, be it to a Directory Server, a Database or even to several other external resources. The following video log demonstrates exactly that. You’ll see:

– Super quick installation of ForgeRock OpenIDM
– Installation of PostgreSQL database, creation of user with super user role in PostgreSQL, creation of a database and finally creation of a table
– Configure the OpenIDM Database connector to connect to the PostgreSQL database table created in the above mentioned step
– And finally see how the users from OpenIDM are provisioned on to the PostgreSQL database table

It’s all very simple and easy to understand. So enjoy!

The Evolution of Identity & Access Management

Identity and access management is going through a renaissance.  Organisations, both public and private have spent thousands of hours (and dollars) implementing and managing infrastructure that can manage the creation of identity information, as well as management of the authentication and authorization tasks associated with those identities.  Many organisations do this stuff, because they have to.  They're too large to perform these tasks manually, or perhaps have external regulations that require that they have a handle on the users who access their key systems. But how and why is all this changing?



The Enterprise and The Perimeter

Changing Identities
15 years ago, identity and access management was focused on stuff that happened within the corporate firewall.  Employees joined the company, were entered into the payroll system and 'IT' set them up on the necessary systems they needed.  That setup process was often manual, inconsistent and perhaps involved several different application and system owners and administrators.  IT being IT, would look to try and automate that account creation process.  This was driven partly by business benefits (new employees don't need to wait 3 days for to get working) and also the costs savings associated with migrating manual tasks to a centralised provisioning system.


Cloud, Services & The Modern Enterprise

Organisations are not the same as they were 15 years.  I talked about this recently with the onset of the 'modern' enterprise.  What does that mean?  Due to economic changes and changes in working patterns,  organisations are now multifaceted complex beasts.  No one team or department can be associated with a single process or business function.  Supply chains are now swollen by outsourced providers, all rapidly engaged and critical to short term product launches or business deliverables.  These business changes rely heavily on an agile identity management and authentication infrastructure, that can not only quickly engage new partners or suppliers, but also track, authorize, audit and remove users when they are no longer required or a partner contract expires.

Continually Connected

Identity from a consumer sense has also altered.  More and more individuals have an identity context on line.  That could be something like a Facebook or LinkedIn account, right through to personal email, banking and ecommerce as well as consumer outsourced services such as Spotify, Kindle books or iTunes.  Individuals are embracing applications and services that can give them non-physical access to experiences or data stores, all centred about their own identity.  These online consumer identities are only as valid of course, if the identity owner is able to connect to those services and sites.  That connectivity is now ubiquitous, making life experiences richer, whilst increasing demands for consumer scale infrastructure.

Standards and More Standards

I recently watched the Gartner on demand catch up series of the recent Catalyst event, that was neatly titled the "Identity Standards Smackdown".  A panel of 5 leading identity go-getters, represented some of the emerging and long standing IAM standards, promoting their worth in the current landscape.  The five represented were OAuth2, SCIM, XACML, OpenID Connect and SAML2.  The details of each are all varied and there are numerous pro's and con's to each.  What is interesting, is that we are now at a position where all of these standards are now playing a part in both public and private enterprise adoption, acting as catalysts for new service offerings by services and software vendors, as well as acting as a yardstick to aid comparisons, maturity metrics, interoperability and more.

The standards all play slightly different parts in the provisioning, authentication and authorization life cycle, but the healthy debate goes to show the both end user and vendor interest in this space is as hot as it has even been.

By Simon Moffatt

The Evolution of Identity & Access Management

Identity and access management is going through a renaissance.  Organisations, both public and private have spent thousands of hours (and dollars) implementing and managing infrastructure that can manage the creation of identity information, as well as management of the authentication and authorization tasks associated with those identities.  Many organisations do this stuff, because they have to.  They're too large to perform these tasks manually, or perhaps have external regulations that require that they have a handle on the users who access their key systems. But how and why is all this changing?



The Enterprise and The Perimeter

Changing Identities
15 years ago, identity and access management was focused on stuff that happened within the corporate firewall.  Employees joined the company, were entered into the payroll system and 'IT' set them up on the necessary systems they needed.  That setup process was often manual, inconsistent and perhaps involved several different application and system owners and administrators.  IT being IT, would look to try and automate that account creation process.  This was driven partly by business benefits (new employees don't need to wait 3 days for to get working) and also the costs savings associated with migrating manual tasks to a centralised provisioning system.


Cloud, Services & The Modern Enterprise

Organisations are not the same as they were 15 years.  I talked about this recently with the onset of the 'modern' enterprise.  What does that mean?  Due to economic changes and changes in working patterns,  organisations are now multifaceted complex beasts.  No one team or department can be associated with a single process or business function.  Supply chains are now swollen by outsourced providers, all rapidly engaged and critical to short term product launches or business deliverables.  These business changes rely heavily on an agile identity management and authentication infrastructure, that can not only quickly engage new partners or suppliers, but also track, authorize, audit and remove users when they are no longer required or a partner contract expires.

Continually Connected

Identity from a consumer sense has also altered.  More and more individuals have an identity context on line.  That could be something like a Facebook or LinkedIn account, right through to personal email, banking and ecommerce as well as consumer outsourced services such as Spotify, Kindle books or iTunes.  Individuals are embracing applications and services that can give them non-physical access to experiences or data stores, all centred about their own identity.  These online consumer identities are only as valid of course, if the identity owner is able to connect to those services and sites.  That connectivity is now ubiquitous, making life experiences richer, whilst increasing demands for consumer scale infrastructure.

Standards and More Standards

I recently watched the Gartner on demand catch up series of the recent Catalyst event, that was neatly titled the "Identity Standards Smackdown".  A panel of 5 leading identity go-getters, represented some of the emerging and long standing IAM standards, promoting their worth in the current landscape.  The five represented were OAuth2, SCIM, XACML, OpenID Connect and SAML2.  The details of each are all varied and there are numerous pro's and con's to each.  What is interesting, is that we are now at a position where all of these standards are now playing a part in both public and private enterprise adoption, acting as catalysts for new service offerings by services and software vendors, as well as acting as a yardstick to aid comparisons, maturity metrics, interoperability and more.

The standards all play slightly different parts in the provisioning, authentication and authorization life cycle, but the healthy debate goes to show the both end user and vendor interest in this space is as hot as it has even been.

By Simon Moffatt