How To Build An Authentication Platform

Today's authentication requirements go way beyond hooking into a database or directory and challenging every user and service for an Id and password.  Authentication and the login experience, is the application entry point and can make or break your security posture and end user experience. 

Authentication is typically associated with identifying, to a certain degree of assurance, who or what you are interacting with.  Authorization is typically identifying and allowing what that person or thing can do.  This blog is focused on the former, but I might stray in to the latter from time to time.

There are numerous use cases that a modern enterprise needs to fulfil, if authentication services are to deliver value.  These can include:

  • Authentication for a service or API
  • Device authentication
  • Metrics, timing and analytics of flows
  • Threat intelligence integration
  • Anonymous to known authentication profiling
  • Contextual analysis
In addition to the basic functional requirements, there are several non-functional basics too.  These are going to include:

  • Simple customisation
  • Being highly available
  • Stateless and elastic
  • Simple integrations
  • API first

I'm going to take some of these key requirements and describe them in a little more detail.

Non Identity Intelligence

From a feature perspective, the new requirements consistently rely upon Intelligence:  the new buzz in the cyber security world.  Every week a new more consolidated threat intelligence tool comes to market.  Organisations up and down the land, are rapidly building out Security Operations Centres (SOC) with wily ex-military veterans creating strategies and starry eyed graduates analysing SIEM and NIDS logs.  We need data.  We have data.  What we need is information.  Actionable intelligence.  Intelligence can be rapidly integrated into any number of different security architecture components. 

Intelligence here, is basically a focus upon non-identity data signals.  Sources of malware, malicious IP addresses, app assurance ratings, breached credentials data and so on.

The vast breadth and depth of cyber threat intelligence (CTI) sources is staggering.  Free, chargeable, subscription based, cloud based, you name it, it's available.  A common factor must be simplicity of integration - ideally via some like a REST/JSON based API that developers are familiar with.  Long tale integration must be avoided too, with the ability to swap out and have a zero barrier to exit being important.  This last point is extremely important.  You need to able to future proof your data inputs.  

Whatever you want to integrate today, will be out of date tomorrow.  

Integration

Integration is not just limited to threat intelligence sources.  This is really just a non-functional, but I want to spend some time on it.  It is quite common to find legacy (I hate this word, let's call them "classic" or initial system) authentication products are generally difficult to integrate against and extend.  

Many systems integrators (SI's) (and many do excellent jobs in highly challenging environments) will work tirelessly, and at some considerable cost, to add different authentication modalities, customize one time password options, integrate with difficult LDAP account lockout options, mobile-ise and more.  These "integration" steps are often described as non-BAU.  They require change control and are charged via a time and materials or scope creep premium model.  Integration costs in a modern system, really need to be minimized if not removed.  Authentication is becoming so fluid that changes including new authentication factors, data sources, UI flows and so on, should be a standard operator journey.

Roadmapping

So why is integration such an issue?  A common problem of historical authentication deployments, has often been around lack of foresight. In honesty, foresight and robust road mapping has never been a real requirement for a login system.  Login using user names and passwords and occasionally an MFA, was pretty much it.  Like it or lump.  Well, in today's digitised ecosystems, new requirements pop up daily.  Think of the following basic scenarios, that will impact an authentication system:

  • New go to markets requiring localization
  • A new product that requires new API's and apps
  • A merger resulting in differing regulatory compliance requirements
  • New attack patterns and vector discovery
  • Competitive innovations
  • Commodity innovations
If you looked at your authentication services library and compare that to the applications and users consuming those services, do you know their functional and non-functional requirements, business objectives and challenges for  the next 12-18 months?  Some will, so the underlying authentication service needs to a) have a road map and b) be able to accommodate new requirements and demands, in a agile and iterative fashion.

Part of this is technical and part of that is operational management.  The business owners of an authentication platform, need to have interactions with the new stakeholders to the login journey.  The login process is basically the application from an end user perspective.  It needs to uphold security, whilst improving the user experience.  Requirements gathering must be a fully integrated process not just for application development, but for identity and authentication services too.


Platform versus Product

I purposefully chose the word platform in the title as opposed to service or product.  Modern authentication is a platform.  It powers transformation, by supporting API's, applications and services that allow organisations to create value driven software.  It becomes the wiring in the hotel, that allows all of the auxiliary products and shiny things to flourish.  

Many point authentication products exist. I am not discrediting them by any means.  Best of breed point solutions for biometry, mobile SDK integration, device operating or behaviour profiling exist and will need integrating to the underlying platform.  They are integration points.  Cogs inside a bigger machine.

The glue that drives the business value however, will be the authentication platform, capable of delivering a range of services to different applications, user communities, geographies and customers.  A single product is unlikely to be able to achieve this.

In summary, authentication has become a critical component, not only for securing user and data centric integrations, but also for helping to deliver continuous modernization of the enterprise.  

It has become a foundational component, that requires a wide breadth of coverage, coupled with agility and extensibility.



How To Build An Authentication Platform

Today's authentication requirements go way beyond hooking into a database or directory and challenging every user and service for an Id and password.  Authentication and the login experience, is the application entry point and can make or break your security posture and end user experience. 

Authentication is typically associated with identifying, to a certain degree of assurance, who or what you are interacting with.  Authorization is typically identifying and allowing what that person or thing can do.  This blog is focused on the former, but I might stray in to the latter from time to time.

There are numerous use cases that a modern enterprise needs to fulfil, if authentication services are to deliver value.  These can include:

  • Authentication for a service or API
  • Device authentication
  • Metrics, timing and analytics of flows
  • Threat intelligence integration
  • Anonymous to known authentication profiling
  • Contextual analysis
In addition to the basic functional requirements, there are several non-functional basics too.  These are going to include:

  • Simple customisation
  • Being highly available
  • Stateless and elastic
  • Simple integrations
  • API first

I'm going to take some of these key requirements and describe them in a little more detail.

Non Identity Intelligence

From a feature perspective, the new requirements consistently rely upon Intelligence:  the new buzz in the cyber security world.  Every week a new more consolidated threat intelligence tool comes to market.  Organisations up and down the land, are rapidly building out Security Operations Centres (SOC) with wily ex-military veterans creating strategies and starry eyed graduates analysing SIEM and NIDS logs.  We need data.  We have data.  What we need is information.  Actionable intelligence.  Intelligence can be rapidly integrated into any number of different security architecture components. 

Intelligence here, is basically a focus upon non-identity data signals.  Sources of malware, malicious IP addresses, app assurance ratings, breached credentials data and so on.

The vast breadth and depth of cyber threat intelligence (CTI) sources is staggering.  Free, chargeable, subscription based, cloud based, you name it, it's available.  A common factor must be simplicity of integration - ideally via some like a REST/JSON based API that developers are familiar with.  Long tale integration must be avoided too, with the ability to swap out and have a zero barrier to exit being important.  This last point is extremely important.  You need to able to future proof your data inputs.  

Whatever you want to integrate today, will be out of date tomorrow.  

Integration

Integration is not just limited to threat intelligence sources.  This is really just a non-functional, but I want to spend some time on it.  It is quite common to find legacy (I hate this word, let's call them "classic" or initial system) authentication products are generally difficult to integrate against and extend.  

Many systems integrators (SI's) (and many do excellent jobs in highly challenging environments) will work tirelessly, and at some considerable cost, to add different authentication modalities, customize one time password options, integrate with difficult LDAP account lockout options, mobile-ise and more.  These "integration" steps are often described as non-BAU.  They require change control and are charged via a time and materials or scope creep premium model.  Integration costs in a modern system, really need to be minimized if not removed.  Authentication is becoming so fluid that changes including new authentication factors, data sources, UI flows and so on, should be a standard operator journey.

Roadmapping

So why is integration such an issue?  A common problem of historical authentication deployments, has often been around lack of foresight. In honesty, foresight and robust road mapping has never been a real requirement for a login system.  Login using user names and passwords and occasionally an MFA, was pretty much it.  Like it or lump.  Well, in today's digitised ecosystems, new requirements pop up daily.  Think of the following basic scenarios, that will impact an authentication system:

  • New go to markets requiring localization
  • A new product that requires new API's and apps
  • A merger resulting in differing regulatory compliance requirements
  • New attack patterns and vector discovery
  • Competitive innovations
  • Commodity innovations
If you looked at your authentication services library and compare that to the applications and users consuming those services, do you know their functional and non-functional requirements, business objectives and challenges for  the next 12-18 months?  Some will, so the underlying authentication service needs to a) have a road map and b) be able to accommodate new requirements and demands, in a agile and iterative fashion.

Part of this is technical and part of that is operational management.  The business owners of an authentication platform, need to have interactions with the new stakeholders to the login journey.  The login process is basically the application from an end user perspective.  It needs to uphold security, whilst improving the user experience.  Requirements gathering must be a fully integrated process not just for application development, but for identity and authentication services too.


Platform versus Product

I purposefully chose the word platform in the title as opposed to service or product.  Modern authentication is a platform.  It powers transformation, by supporting API's, applications and services that allow organisations to create value driven software.  It becomes the wiring in the hotel, that allows all of the auxiliary products and shiny things to flourish.  

Many point authentication products exist. I am not discrediting them by any means.  Best of breed point solutions for biometry, mobile SDK integration, device operating or behaviour profiling exist and will need integrating to the underlying platform.  They are integration points.  Cogs inside a bigger machine.

The glue that drives the business value however, will be the authentication platform, capable of delivering a range of services to different applications, user communities, geographies and customers.  A single product is unlikely to be able to achieve this.

In summary, authentication has become a critical component, not only for securing user and data centric integrations, but also for helping to deliver continuous modernization of the enterprise.  

It has become a foundational component, that requires a wide breadth of coverage, coupled with agility and extensibility.



Brokering Identity Services Into Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Introduction

Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) deployments are maturing across the corporate landscape. PCF’s out-of-the-box identity and access management (IAM) tool, UAA (User Accounts and Authentication), provides basic user management functions and OAuth 2.0/OIDC 1.0 support. UAA has come a long way since its inception and provides a solid foundation of IAM services for an isolated application ecosystem running on the Pivotal platform. As organizations experience ever more demanding requirements pushed on their applications, they start realizing the need for a full IAM platform that provides identity services beyond what UAA can offer. Integrating applications running on Pivotal with applications running outside the platform, providing strong and adaptive authentication journeys, managing identities across applications, enforcing security policies and more requires a full-service IAM platform like ForgeRock’s Identity Platform.

ForgeRock provides a Pivotal service broker implementation, the ForgeRock Service Broker. It runs as a small service inside Pivotal and brokers two services into the PCF platform: An OAuth 2.0 AM Service and an IG Route Service. While the OAuth 2.0 AM Service provides similar capabilities to UAA on the OAuth/OIDC side, the IG Route Service is based on IG (Identity Gateway) and can broker the full spectrum of services of the ForgeRock Identity Platform. PCF applications bound to the IG Route Service can seamlessly consume any of the countless services the ForgeRock Identity Platform provides: Intelligent authentication, authorization, federation, user-managed access, identity synchronization, user self-service, workflow, social identity, directory services, API gateway services and more.

This article provides an easy-to-follow path to:

  • Set up a PCF development environment (PCF Dev)
  • Install and configure IG in that environment
  • Install and configure the ForgeRock Service Broker in that environment
  • Deploy, integrate and protect a number of PCF sample applications using the IG Route Service and IG

Additionally, the guide provides steps how to run IG on PCF. If you have access to a full PCF instance, you can skip the PCF Dev part and dive right into the Service Broker deployment and configuration. You also need access to a ForgeRock Access Management instance 5.0 or newer.

1. Preparing a PCF Dev environment

As mentioned, if you have access to a full PCF instance, you can skip this part and go straight  to the Service Broker deployment and configuration.

1.1. Installing CF CLI

Before you install the server side of the PCF Dev environment, you must first install the Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface (CF CLI) utility, which is the main way you will interact with PCF throughout this process.

Follow the Pivotal documentation to install the flavor of the CLI you need for your workstation OS:

https://docs.run.pivotal.io/cf-cli/install-go-cli.html

1.2. Installing PCF Dev

Now that you are ready to roll with the CF CLI, it is time to download and install the PCF Dev components. This article is based on PCF Dev v0.30.0 for PCF 1.11.0. This version is based on a VirtualBox and has a number of default services installed, some of which you will need later on.

PCF Dev – PAS 2.0.18.0 is an alpha release of the NextGen PCF Dev using the native OS hypervisor, doubling the minimum memory requirements from 4G to 8G, having only a few PCF services installed by default, and taking up to 1h to start. It does however include a full BOSH Director, which is the graphical UI to manage “Tiles” in PCF vs having to use the CLI. As soon as this version is a bit more stable and bundles more services like the old one did, it might be worth upgrading. But for now, make sure you select and download v0.30.0:

https://network.pivotal.io/products/pcfdev

In order to use your own IP address and DNS name (-i and -d parameters of the cf dev start command) you need to set up a wildcard DNS record. In my case I setup *.pcfdev.mytestrun.com pointing to my workstation’s IP address where I am running PCF Dev.

Follow the command log below to install and start PCF Dev:

unzip pcfdev-v0.30.0_PCF1.11.0-osx.zip
./pcfdev-v0.30.0+PCF1.11.0-osx
cf dev start -i 192.168.37.73 -d pcfdev.mytestrun.com -m 6144
Warning: the chosen PCF Dev VM IP address may be in use by another VM or device.
Using existing image.
Allocating 6144 MB out of 16384 MB total system memory (6591 MB free).
Importing VM...
Starting VM...
Provisioning VM...
Waiting for services to start...
7 out of 58 running
7 out of 58 running
7 out of 58 running
7 out of 58 running
40 out of 58 running
56 out of 58 running
58 out of 58 running
 _______  _______  _______    ______   _______  __   __
|       ||       ||       |  |      | |       ||  | |  |
|    _  ||       ||    ___|  |  _    ||    ___||  |_|  |
|   |_| ||       ||   |___   | | |   ||   |___ |       |
|    ___||      _||    ___|  | |_|   ||    ___||       |
|   |    |     |_ |   |      |       ||   |___  |     |
|___|    |_______||___|      |______| |_______|  |___|
is now running.
To begin using PCF Dev, please run:
   cf login -a https://api.pcfdev.mytestrun.com --skip-ssl-validation
Apps Manager URL: https://apps.pcfdev.mytestrun.com
Admin user => Email: admin / Password: admin
Regular user => Email: user / Password: pass

1.3 Logging in to PCF Dev

Login to your fresh PCF Dev instance and select the org you want to work with. Use the pcfdev-org:

cf login -a https://api.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/ --skip-ssl-validation
API endpoint: https://api.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/
Email> admin
Password>
Authenticating...
OK
Select an org (or press enter to skip):
1. pcfdev-org
2. system
Org> 1
Targeted org pcfdev-org
Targeted space pcfdev-space

API endpoint:  https://api.pcfdev.mytestrun.com (API version: 2.82.0)
User:          admin
Org:            pcfdev-org
Space:          pcfdev-space

Authenticate using admin/admin if using PCF Dev or a Pivotal admin user if using a real PCF instance.

2. Install Sample Applications

To test the Service Broker and inter-application SSO, install 2 sample applications:

2.1. Spring Music

git clone https://github.com/cloudfoundry-samples/spring-music
cd spring-music

Modify manifest to reduce memory and avoid random route names:

vi manifest.yml

Enter or copy & paste the following content:

---
applications:
- name: music
  memory: 768M
  random-route: false
  path: build/libs/spring-music-1.0.jar

Push the app:

cf push

Waiting for app to start...
name:           music
requested state:   started
instances:      1/1
usage:          768M x 1 instances
routes:            music.pcfdev.mytestrun.com
last uploaded:  Tue 22 May 15:28:24 CDT 2018
stack:          cflinuxfs2
buildpack:      container-certificate-trust-store=2.0.0_RELEASE java-buildpack=v3.13-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#03b493f
                java-main open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_121 open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.2_RELEASE spring-auto-reconfiguration=1.10...
start command:  CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.2_RELEASE
                -memorySizes=metaspace:64m..,stack:228k.. -memoryWeights=heap:65,metaspace:10,native:15,stack:10 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100%
                -stackThreads=300 -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) && JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR
                -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY
                -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=$PWD/.java-buildpack/container_certificate_trust_store/truststore.jks
                -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=java-buildpack-trust-store-password" && SERVER_PORT=$PORT eval exec
                $PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java $JAVA_OPTS -cp $PWD/. org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher

     state    since                  cpu      memory          disk          details
#0   running   2018-05-22T20:29:00Z   226.8% 530.4M of 768M   168M of 512M

Note the routes: music.pcfdev.mytestrun.com

That’s the URL at which your application can be reached. You should be able to resolve the dynamically generated DNS name. You should also be able to hit the URL in a web browser.

Retrieve application logs:

cf logs music --recent

Live-tail application logs:

cf logs music

2.2. Cloud Foundry Sample NodeJS App

git clone https://github.com/cloudfoundry-samples/cf-sample-app-nodejs.git
cd cf-sample-app-nodejs

Modify manifest to reduce memory and avoid random route names:

vi manifest.yml

---
applications:
- name: node
  memory: 512M
  instances: 1
  random-route: false

Push the app:

cf push

Waiting for app to start...
name:           node
requested state:   started
instances:      1/1
usage:          512M x 1 instances
routes:            node.pcfdev.mytestrun.com
last uploaded:  Tue 22 May 15:46:02 CDT 2018
stack:          cflinuxfs2
buildpack:      node.js 1.5.32
start command:  npm start

     state    since                  cpu    memory      disk        details
#0   running   2018-05-22T20:46:35Z   0.0% 0 of 512M 0 of 512M   

Note the routes: node.pcfdev.mytestrun.com

That’s the URL at which your application can be reached. You should be able to resolve the dynamically generated DNS name. You should also be able to hit the URL in a web browser.

Retrieve application logs:

$ cf logs node —recent

Live-tail application logs:

cf logs node

2.3. Create Your Own JSP Headers App

Create your very own useful sample application to display headers. This will come in handy for future experiments with the IG Route Service.

mkdir headers
cd headers
mkdir WEB-INF
vi index.jsp

<%@ page import="java.util.*" %>
<html>
<head>
<title><%= application.getServerInfo() %></title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>HTTP Request Headers Received</h1>
<table border="1" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="3">
<%
Enumeration eNames = request.getHeaderNames();
while (eNames.hasMoreElements()) {
String name = (String) eNames.nextElement();
String value = normalize(request.getHeader(name));
%>
<tr><td><%= name %></td><td><%= value %></td></tr>
<%
}
%>
</table>
</body>
</html>
<%!
private String normalize(String value)
{
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
for (int i = 0; i < value.length(); i++) {
char c = value.charAt(i);
sb.append(c);
if (c == ';')
sb.append("<br>");
}
return sb.toString();
}
%>
cf push headers


Waiting for app to start...
name:           headers
requested state:   started
instances:      1/1
usage:          256M x 1 instances
routes:            headers.pcfdev.mytestrun.com
last uploaded:  Tue 22 May 16:24:26 CDT 2018
stack:          cflinuxfs2
buildpack:      container-certificate-trust-store=2.0.0_RELEASE java-buildpack=v3.13-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#03b493f
                open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_121 open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.2_RELEASE tomcat-access-logging-support=2.5.0_RELEAS...
start command:  CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.2_RELEASE
                -memorySizes=metaspace:64m..,stack:228k.. -memoryWeights=heap:65,metaspace:10,native:15,stack:10 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100%
                -stackThreads=300 -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) &&  JAVA_HOME=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR
                -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY
                -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=$PWD/.java-buildpack/container_certificate_trust_store/truststore.jks
                -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=java-buildpack-trust-store-password -Djava.endorsed.dirs=$PWD/.java-buildpack/tomcat/endorsed
                -Daccess.logging.enabled=false -Dhttp.port=$PORT" exec $PWD/.java-buildpack/tomcat/bin/catalina.sh run

     state    since                  cpu    memory        disk            details
#0   running   2018-05-22T21:24:48Z   0.0% 600K of 256M 84.6M of 512M  

2.4. More Sample Apps

git clone https://github.com/cloudfoundry-samples/cf-ex-php-info
git clone https://github.com/cloudfoundry-samples/cf-sample-app-rails.git

3. Running IG in Pivotal Cloud Foundry

You can run IG absolutely anywhere you want, but since you are going to use it inside PCF, running it in PCF may be a logic choice.

3.1. Install, Deploy, and Configure  IG in PCF

The steps below describe an opinionated deployment model for IG in PCF. Your specific environment may require you to make different choices to achieve an ideal configuration and behavior.

3.1.1. Download IG

Download IG 6 from https://backstage.forgerock.com/downloads/browse/ig/latest to a preferred working location. Login using your backstage credentials.

unzip IG-6.1.0.war
cf push ig --no-start

3.1.2. Enable Development Mode

cf set-env ig IG_RUN_MODE development

3.1.3. Create And Use Persistent Volume For Configuration Data

IG is configured using JSON files. This section is an easy way to create a share storage volume that can persist your IG configuration between restarts. If you run IG using its default configuration, it will lose all its configuration every time it restarts because the app is reset. Externalizing the config allows the configuration to reside outside the app and persist between restarts. In a real PCF environment (vs a PCF DEV environment) you would probably use a different shared storage like an NSF service or the like. But for development purposes, a local-volume will work great.

(https://github.com/cloudfoundry/local-volume-release)

cf create-service local-volume free-local-disk local-volume-instance
cf bind-service ig local-volume-instance -c '{"mount":"/var/openig"}'
cf set-env ig IG_INSTANCE_DIR '/var/openig'

3.1.4. Start IG applying all the configuration changes we have made

cf start ig

3.1.5. Logs

cf logs ig --recent

3.1.6. Apply Required Configuration

3.1.6.1. SSH into your IG instance

cf ssh ig
cd /var/openig
mkdir config
vi config/config.json

3.1.6.2. Apply configuration

Create /var/openig/config/config.json and populate with default configuration as documented here:

https://backstage.forgerock.com/docs/forgerock-service-broker/2/forgerock-service-broker-guide/#implementation-setting-up-openig

{
  "heap": [
     {
       "name": "ClientHandler",
       "type": "ClientHandler",
       "config": {
         "hostnameVerifier": "ALLOW_ALL",
         "trustManager": {
           "type": "TrustAllManager"
         }
       }
    },
    {
      "name": "_router",
      "type": "Router",
      "config": {
        "defaultHandler": {
          "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
          "config": {
            "status": 404,
            "reason": "Not Found",
            "headers": {
              "Content-Type": [
                "application/json"
              ]
            },
            "entity": "{ \"error\": \"Something went wrong, contact the sys admin\"}"
          }
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "type": "Chain",
      "name": "CloudFoundryProxy",
      "config": {
        "filters": [
          {
            "type": "ScriptableFilter",
            "name": "CloudFoundryRequestRebaser",
            "comment": "Rebase the request based on the CloudFoundry provided headers",
            "config": {
              "type": "application/x-groovy",
              "source": [
                "Request newRequest = new Request(request);",
                "org.forgerock.util.Utils.closeSilently(request);",
                "newRequest.uri = URI.create(request.headers['X-CF-Forwarded-Url'].firstValue);",
                "newRequest.headers['Host'] = newRequest.uri.host;",
                "logger.info('Receive request : ' + request.uri + ' forwarding to ' + newRequest.uri);",
                "Context newRoutingContext = org.forgerock.http.routing.UriRouterContext.uriRouterContext(context).originalUri(newRequest.uri.asURI()).build();",
                "return next.handle(newRoutingContext, newRequest);"
              ]
            }
          }
        ],
        "handler": "_router"
      },
      "capture": [
        "request",
        "response"
      ]
    }
  ],
  "handler": {
    "type": "DispatchHandler",
    "name": "Dispatcher",
    "config": {
      "bindings": [
        {
          "condition": "${not empty request.headers['X-CF-Forwarded-Url']}",
          "handler": "CloudFoundryProxy"
        },
        {
          "handler": {
            "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
            "config": {
              "status": 400,
              "entity": "Bad request : expecting a header X-CF-Forwarded-Url"
            }
          }
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

Then:

exit cf
restart ig

3.1.7. Access IG Studio

http://ig.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/openig/studio/

4. Install ForgeRock Service Broker

Download and install the service broker following the instructions in the doc:

https://backstage.forgerock.com/docs/forgerock-service-broker/2/forgerock-service-broker-guide/#implementation-installing-into-cloud-foundry

4.1. Deploy and Configure the Service Broker App

cf push forgerockbroker-app -p service-broker-servlet-2.0.1.war
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app SECURITY_USER_NAME f8Q7hyHKgz
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app SECURITY_USER_PASSWORD n3BpjwKW4m
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app OPENAM_BASE_URI https://idp.mytestrun.com/openam/
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app OPENAM_USERNAME CloudFoundryAgentAdmin
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app OPENAM_PASSWORD KZDJhN7Vr4
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app OAUTH2_SCOPES profile
cf set-env forgerockbroker-app OPENIG_BASE_URI https://ig.pcfdev.mytestrun.com
cf restage forgerockbroker-app

Note that OPENIG_BASE_URI is specified as https, not http! If specified as http, the following error occurred when binding the ig route service to an application:

cf bind-route-service pcfdev.mytestrun.com igrs --hostname spring-music-chatty-quokka
Binding route spring-music-chatty-quokka.pcfdev.mytestrun.com to service instance igrs in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
FAILED
Server error, status code: 502, error code: 10001, message: The service broker returned an invalid response for the request to http://forgerockbroker-app.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/v2/service_instances/4aa37a88-afc0-4e75-9474-d5e2ed3e7876/service_bindings/c8da2445-6689-4824-afd1-125795e2a848. Status Code: 201 Created, Body: {"route_service_url":"http://ig.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/4aa37a88-afc0-4e75-9474-d5e2ed3e7876/c8da2445-6689-4824-afd1-125795e2a848"}

To see the service broker app’s environment:

cf env forgerockbroker-app

To see the service broker app’s details:

cf app forgerockbroker-app

Create service broker:

cf create-service-broker forgerockbroker f8Q7hyHKgz n3BpjwKW4m http://forgerockbroker-app.pcfdev.mytestrun.com

Enable the service you plan on using. The ForgeRock Service Broker supports OAuth and IG. You can enable either or both.

cf enable-service-access forgerock-ig-route-service
cf enable-service-access forgerock-am-oauth2

Create the service instance(s) you will be using for your apps. You should only need one instance per service to handle any number of applications:

cf create-service forgerock-ig-route-service shared igrs
cf create-service forgerock-am-oauth2 shared amrs

4.2. Bind IG Route Service to the Sample Apps

Note how no apps are bound to the IG Route Service (igrs):

cf routes
Getting routes for org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin ...
space          host                  domain                port  path  type  apps                  service
pcfdev-space  music                 pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     music
pcfdev-space  node                  pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     node
pcfdev-space  rails                 pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     rails
pcfdev-space  headers               pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     headrs
pcfdev-space  ig                    pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     ig
pcfdev-space  forgerockbroker-app   pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     forgerockbroker-app

Bind the Route Service to the apps:

cf bind-route-service pcfdev.mytestrun.com igrs --hostname music
cf bind-route-service pcfdev.mytestrun.com igrs --hostname node
cf bind-route-service pcfdev.mytestrun.com igrs --hostname rails
cf bind-route-service pcfdev.mytestrun.com igrs --hostname headers

Now the two sample apps are bound to our IG Route Service:

cf routes
Getting routes for org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin ...
space          host                              domain                port  path  type  apps                  service
pcfdev-space  music                 pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     music              igrs
pcfdev-space  node                  pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     node               igrs
pcfdev-space  rails                 pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     rails              igrs
pcfdev-space  headers               pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     headers            igrs
pcfdev-space  ig                    pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     ig
pcfdev-space  forgerockbroker-app   pcfdev.mytestrun.com                     forgerockbroker-app

5. Define IG Routes for the Sample Apps

By default, no routes are defined in IG for our sample apps and the default behavior in IG (defined in config.json you created earlier) is to deny access to everything. So the next and very important step is now to define routes that re-enable access to our sample applications. Once the basic routes are defined, we can add authentication and authorization per application as we see fit:

  • Point your browser to the IG Studio: http://ig.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/openig/studio/
  • Select “Protect an Application” from the Studio home screen, then select “Structured.”
  • Select “Advanced options” and enter the app URL from the step where you pushed the app to PCF.
    • Since PCF does hostname-based routing (vs path-based) you have to change the Condition that selects your route accordingly. Into the Condition field, select “Expression” and enter:
      ${matches(request.uri.host, ‘^app-url’)}
      E.g.:
      ${matches(request.uri.host, ‘^music.pcfdev.mytestrun.com’)}
    • Pick a descriptive name and a unique ID for the application
    • Select “Create route”

  • Deploy your route.
  • You have now created a route with default configuration, which simply proxies requests through IG to the app. That means your app is available again like it was before you implemented IG and the Service Broker. The next step is to add value to your route like authentication or authorization.

5.1. Prepare for Authentication and Authorization

As a preparatory step to authentication and authorization, create an AM Service for your route, which is a piece of configuration pointing to your ForgeRock Access Management instance. Select “AM service” from the left side menu and provide the details of your AM instance:

You won’t need the agent section populated for the use cases here.

5.2. Broker Authentication to an Application

  • To add authentication to your route, select “Authentication” from the left side menu and move the slider “Enable authentication” to the right, then select “Single Sign-On” as your authentication option.
  • In the configuration dialog popping up, select your AM service:

    Then select “Save”.
  • Deploy your route.
  • In a browser, point your browser to your app URL, e.g. https://music.pcfdev.mytestrun.com/
  • Notice how you will be redirected to your Access Management login page for authentication. Provide valid login credentials and your sample app should load.
  • Repeat with the other apps. Note how you can now SSO between all the apps!
  • Now let’s add authorization to one of the routes and only allow members of a certain group access to that application. For that, we need some additional prep work in AM:
    • Create a J2EE agent IG can use to evaluate AM policies:

    • Create a new policy set with the name “PCF” or a name and ID of your liking:

      Add URL as the resource type.
    • Create a policy and name it after your application you are protecting. Specify your app URL as the resource, allow GET as an action, and specify the subject condition to require a group membership. In this example, we want membership in the “Engineering” group to be required for access to the “headers” application:

      Your policy summary page should look something like this:

  • Now come back to IG Studio and select the route of the app you created your policy for, in our case the “headers” app and select “Authorization” from the left side bar and move the slider “Enable authorization” to the right, then select “AM Policy Enforcement” as your way to authorize users.
  • Select your AM service, specify your realm and provide the name of the J2EE agent you created in an earlier step and the password. In the policy endpoint section specify the name of your policy set and the expression to retrieve your SSO token; the default should work: ${contexts.ssoToken.value}

  • Save and deploy your route.
  • Point your browser to the protected app and login using a user who is a member of the group you configured to control access. Notice how the app loads after logging in.
  • Now remove the user from the group and refresh the app. Notice how the page goes blank because the user is no longer authorized.

Conclusion

With this setup, applications can now be integrated, protected, SSO-enabled, and identity-infused within minutes. Provide profile self-service, password reset, strong and step-up authentication, continuous authentication, authorization, and risk evaluation to any application in the Pivotal Cloud Foundry ecosystem.

The Role Of Mobile During Authentication

Nearly all the big player social networks now provide a multi-factor authentication option – either an SMS sent code or perhaps key derived one-time password, accessible via a mobile app.  Examples include Google’s Authenticator, Facebook’s options for MFA (including their Code Generator, built into their mobile app) or LinkedIn’s two-step verification.  There are lots more examples, but the main component is using the user’s mobile phone as an out of band authenticator channel.

Phone as a Secondary Device - “Phone-as-a-Token”

The common term for this is “phone-as-a-token”.  Depending on the statistics, basic mobile phones are now so ubiquitous that the ability to leverage at least SMS delivered one one-time-passwords (OTP) for users who do not have either data plans or smart phones is common.  This is an initial step in moving away from the traditional user name and password based login.  However, since the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released their view that SMS based OTP delivery is deemed insecure, there has been constant innovations around how best to integrate phone-based out of band authentication.  Push notifications are one and local or native biometry is another, often coupled with FIDO (Fast Identity Online) for secure application integration.

EMM and Device Authentication

But using a phone as an out of band authentication device, often overlooks the credibility and assurance of the device itself.  If push based notification apps are used, whilst the security and integrity of those apps can be guaranteed to a certain degree, the device the app is installed upon can not necessarily be attested to the same levels.  What about environments where BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is used?  What about the potential for either jail broken operating systems or low assurance or worse still malware based apps running parallel to the push authentication app?  Does that impact credibility and assurance?  Could that result in the app being compromised in some way? 

In the internal identity space, Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) software often comes to the rescue here – perhaps issuing and distributing certs of key pairs to devices in order to perform device validation, before accepting the out band verification step.  This can often be coupled with app assurance checks and OS baseline versioning.  However this is often time-consuming and complex and isn’t always possible in the consumer or digital identity space.

Multi-band to Single-band Login

Whilst you can achieve both a user authentication, device authentication and out of band authentication nirvana, let’s spin forward and simulate a world where the majority of interactions are solely via a mobile device.  So we no longer have an “out of band” authentication vehicle.  The main application login occurs on the mobile.  So what does that really mean?  Well we lose the secondary binding.  But if the initial application authentication leverages the mechanics of the original out of band (aka local biometry, crypto/FIDO integration) is there anything to worry about?  Well the initial device to user binding is still an avenue that requires further investigation.  I guess by removing an out of band process, we are reducing the number of signals or factors.  Also, unless a biometric local authentication process is used, the risk of credential theft increases substantially. 

Leave your phone on the train, with a basic local PIN based authentication that allows access to refresh_tokens or private keys and we’re back to the “keys to the castle” scenario.


User, Device & Contextual Analysis

So we’re back to a situation where we need to augment what is in fact a single factor login journey.

The physical identity is bound to a digital device. How can we have a continuous level of assurance for the user to app interaction?  We need to add additional signals – commonly known as context. 

This “context” could well include environmental data such as geo-location, time, network addressing or more behavioural such as movement or gait analysis or app usage patterns.  The main driver being a movement away from the big bang login event, where assurance is very high, with a long slow tail drop off as time goes by.  This correlates to the adage of short lived sessions or access_tokens – mainly as assurance can not be guaranteed as time from authentication event increases.

This “context” is then used to attempt lots of smaller micro-authentication events – perhaps checking at every use of an access_token or when a session is presented to an access control event.

So once a mobile user has “logged in” to the app, in the background there is a lot more activity looking for changes regarding to context (either environmental or behavioural).   No more out of band, just a lot of micro-steps.

As authentication becomes more transparent or passive, the real effort then moves to physical to digital binding or user proofing...

The Role Of Mobile During Authentication

Nearly all the big player social networks now provide a multi-factor authentication option – either an SMS sent code or perhaps key derived one-time password, accessible via a mobile app.  Examples include Google’s Authenticator, Facebook’s options for MFA (including their Code Generator, built into their mobile app) or LinkedIn’s two-step verification.  There are lots more examples, but the main component is using the user’s mobile phone as an out of band authenticator channel.

Phone as a Secondary Device - “Phone-as-a-Token”

The common term for this is “phone-as-a-token”.  Depending on the statistics, basic mobile phones are now so ubiquitous that the ability to leverage at least SMS delivered one one-time-passwords (OTP) for users who do not have either data plans or smart phones is common.  This is an initial step in moving away from the traditional user name and password based login.  However, since the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released their view that SMS based OTP delivery is deemed insecure, there has been constant innovations around how best to integrate phone-based out of band authentication.  Push notifications are one and local or native biometry is another, often coupled with FIDO (Fast Identity Online) for secure application integration.

EMM and Device Authentication

But using a phone as an out of band authentication device, often overlooks the credibility and assurance of the device itself.  If push based notification apps are used, whilst the security and integrity of those apps can be guaranteed to a certain degree, the device the app is installed upon can not necessarily be attested to the same levels.  What about environments where BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is used?  What about the potential for either jail broken operating systems or low assurance or worse still malware based apps running parallel to the push authentication app?  Does that impact credibility and assurance?  Could that result in the app being compromised in some way? 

In the internal identity space, Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) software often comes to the rescue here – perhaps issuing and distributing certs of key pairs to devices in order to perform device validation, before accepting the out band verification step.  This can often be coupled with app assurance checks and OS baseline versioning.  However this is often time-consuming and complex and isn’t always possible in the consumer or digital identity space.

Multi-band to Single-band Login

Whilst you can achieve both a user authentication, device authentication and out of band authentication nirvana, let’s spin forward and simulate a world where the majority of interactions are solely via a mobile device.  So we no longer have an “out of band” authentication vehicle.  The main application login occurs on the mobile.  So what does that really mean?  Well we lose the secondary binding.  But if the initial application authentication leverages the mechanics of the original out of band (aka local biometry, crypto/FIDO integration) is there anything to worry about?  Well the initial device to user binding is still an avenue that requires further investigation.  I guess by removing an out of band process, we are reducing the number of signals or factors.  Also, unless a biometric local authentication process is used, the risk of credential theft increases substantially. 

Leave your phone on the train, with a basic local PIN based authentication that allows access to refresh_tokens or private keys and we’re back to the “keys to the castle” scenario.


User, Device & Contextual Analysis

So we’re back to a situation where we need to augment what is in fact a single factor login journey.

The physical identity is bound to a digital device. How can we have a continuous level of assurance for the user to app interaction?  We need to add additional signals – commonly known as context. 

This “context” could well include environmental data such as geo-location, time, network addressing or more behavioural such as movement or gait analysis or app usage patterns.  The main driver being a movement away from the big bang login event, where assurance is very high, with a long slow tail drop off as time goes by.  This correlates to the adage of short lived sessions or access_tokens – mainly as assurance can not be guaranteed as time from authentication event increases.

This “context” is then used to attempt lots of smaller micro-authentication events – perhaps checking at every use of an access_token or when a session is presented to an access control event.

So once a mobile user has “logged in” to the app, in the background there is a lot more activity looking for changes regarding to context (either environmental or behavioural).   No more out of band, just a lot of micro-steps.

As authentication becomes more transparent or passive, the real effort then moves to physical to digital binding or user proofing...

Step up authentication OpenID Connect

A common use case in access management is step up authentication. ForgeRock AM is very good for that. The OIDC standard talks about step up authentication and level of authentication requested by the client.

To do so, one could use acr_values which is a voluntary claim, but the openid specification says : «  the Authorization Server is not required to provide this Claim in its response. »
In order to achieve that, the essential claim acr is used, it is describe in chapter 5.5.1.1. Requesting the “acr” Claim of the OpenID Core (see: http://openid.net/specs/openid-connect-core-1_0.html#acrSemantics)

In order to demonstrate the functionality, use the following example based on AM 5.1:

In the AM console, browse to Realms >Realm Name>Services, and then click OAuth2 Provider.
Configure the mapping between acr values (in the example 1=ldapService and 2=HOTP chain) in the authorization request and AM authentication chains.

 

OAuth 2 Provider service configuration

HOTP chain contains HOTP module only

Step 1:
The url decoded value of the claims parameter:

{
    “id_token”: 
        {
            “acr”:
                {    
                    “essential”: true, 
                    “values”:[“1”]
                }
        }
}

Click on the URL
http://openam.example.com:8080/openam/oauth2/authorize?response_type=code&scope=openid%20profile&client_id=myClientID&redirect_uri=http%3A%2F%2Fopenam.example.com%3A8080%2Fopenid%2Fcb-basic.html&claims=%7B%22id_token%22%3A%20%7B%22acr%22%3A%7B%22essential%22%3A%20true%2C%20%22values%22%3A%5B%221%22%5D%7D%7D%7D

The user enters the login / password

The id tokens returns acr=1

Step 2:

The url decoded value of the claims parameter:
{
    “id_token”: 
        {
            “acr”:
                {    
                    “essential”: true, 
                    “values”:[“2”]
                }
        }
}

Click on the URL:
http://openam.example.com:8080/openam/oauth2/authorize?response_type=code&scope=openid%20profile&client_id=myClientID&redirect_uri=http%3A%2F%2Fopenam.example.com%3A8080%2Fopenid%2Fcb-basic.html&claims=%7B%22id_token%22%3A%20%7B%22acr%22%3A%7B%22essential%22%3A%20true%2C%20%22values%22%3A%5B%222%22%5D%7D%7D%7D

The user receives OTP and enters the OTP in the login screen.

The id tokens returns acr=2

Note that this is a real step up authentication, the session is alive from step 1 to step 2, the OTP is sent to the user connected at the first step.

 

FranceConnect authentication and registration in ForgeRock AM 5

FranceConnect is the French national Identity Provider (IDP). This IDP acts as a hub that is connected to third party IDPs: La Poste (Mail service), Ameli (Health agency) , impots.gouv.fr (Tax service). National IDP is not a new concept in Europe where the eIDAS regulation applied for years, for example Fedict in Belgium or gov.uk in UK. Whereas the National IDPs are mostly SAML based (some of them uses the Stork profile) the FranceConnect service is OpenID Connect based.

ForgeRock is a FranceConnect partner.

This article explains the FranceConnect implementation in ForgeRock Access Manager 5.0

First creates an account on FranceConnect here https://partenaires.franceconnect.gouv.fr/monprojet/inscription, it takes few minutes.

The only information needed is the callback URL, for example: http://openam.example.com/openam/oauth2c/OAuthProxy.jsp

The clientID « key » and the client secret « secret » will be sent by email.

Then the configuration is done in the admin console of the ForgeRock AM.

Go to Authentication>Modules and create a new OAuth 2.0 / OpenID Connect authentication module.

This configuration maps the user using the email attribute, automatically creates the user in the datastore (optional).

The following attributes have been mapped: given_name=givenname family_name=sn email=mail. The full FranceConnect attribute list is here: https://partenaires.franceconnect.gouv.fr/fournisseur-service

Go to Authentication>Chains and create a new authentication chain FranceConnectNationalAuthenticationService which contains the FranceConnect authentication module as required.

In order to activate the FranceConnect button add it in Services>Social Authentication Implementations.

Lets try!

Go to the login page.

Choose « s’identifier avec FranceConnect »

Example account are provided for major IDP.

Choose the Ameli.fr IDP; example account is login : 18712345678912345 and password :123

The account is stored in the AM datastore.

You are now logged in with Mr Eric Mercier!