What’s New in ForgeRock Access Management

forgerock-access-management-whats-new-jan17

If you’re interested in hearing what’s coming up for ForgeRock Access Management, have a look at the replay of a webinar Andy Hall and I did yesterday. In it, we discuss how the ForgeRock Identity Platform addresses the challenges of customer identity relationship management, and the new features coming up in ForgeRock Access Management in our next platform release.

The Future is Now: What’s New in ForgeRock Access Management webinar replay

Or you can flip through slides over on SlideShare.

Hope you enjoy it!

Protect Bearer Tokens Using Proof of Possession

Bearer tokens are the cash of the digital world.  They need to be protected.  Whoever gets hold of them, can well, basically use them as if they were you. Pretty much the same as cash.  The shop owner only really checks the cash is real, they don’t check that the £5 note you produced from your wallet is actually your £5 note.

This has been an age old issue in web access management technologies, both for stateless and stateful token types, OAuth2 access and refresh tokens, as well as OpenID Connect id tokens.

In the hyper connected Consumer Identity & Access Management (CIAM) and Internet (Identity) of Things worlds, this can become a big problem.

Token misuse, perhaps via MITM (man in the middle) attacks, or even resource server misconfiguration, could result in considerable data compromise.

However, there are some newer standards that look to add some binding ability to the tokens – that is, glue them to a particular user or device based on some simple crypto.

The unstable nightly source and build of OpenAM has added the proof of possession capability to the OAuth2 provider service. (Perhaps the first vendor to do so? Email me if you see other implementations..).

The idea is, that the client makes a normal request for an access_token from the authorization service (AS), but also adds another parameter in the request, that contains some crypto the client has access to – basically a public key of an asymmetric key pair.

This key, which could be ephemeral for that request, is then baked into the access_token.  If the access_token is a JWT, the JWT contains this public key and the JWT is then signed by the authorization service.  If using a stateful access_token, the AS token introspection endpoint can relay the public key back to the resource server at look up time.

This basically gives the RS an option to then issue a challenge response style interaction with the client to see if they are in possession of the private key pair – thus proving they are the correct recipient of the originally issued access_token!

 

The basic flow, sees the addition of a new parameter to the access_token request to the OpenAM authorization service, under the name of “cnf_key”.  This is a confirmation key, that the client is in possession of.  In this example, it would be a base64 encoded JSON Web Key representation of a public key.

So for example, a POST request to the endpoint ../openam/oauth2/access_token, would now take the parameters grant_type, scope and also cnf_key, with an authorization header containing the OAuth2 client id and secret as normal.  A cnf_key could look something like this:

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

Running that through base64 -d on bash, or via an online base64 decoder, shows something like the following: (NB this JWK was created using an online tool for simple testing)

{
   "jwk":
            "alg": "RS256",
             "e": "AQAB",
             "n": "vL34QxymwHwWD9ZVL9ciN6bNrnOu524r7Y34oRRWFJcZ77KWWhpuJ-                               bJVWUSTwvJLgVMiCfaqI6DZr05d6TgN53_2IUZkG-                                                x36pEl6YEk5wVg_Q1zQdxFGfDhxPVj2wMcMr1rGHuQADx-jWbGxdG-2W1qlTGPOnwJIjbOpVmQaBc4xRbwjzsltmmrws2fMMKML5jnqpGdhyd_uyEMM0tzMLaMISv3ifxS6QL7skie6yj2qjlTMGwB08KoYPD6BUOiwzAldRb_3y8mP6Mv9p7oApay6BoniYO2iRrK31RTZ-YVPtey9eIfuwFEsDjW3DKBAKmk2XFcCdLq2SWcUaNsQ",
          "kty": "RSA",
           "use": "sig",
            "kid": "smoff-key"
     }
}

The authorization service, should then return the normal access_token payload.  If using stateless OAuth2 access_tokens, the access_token will contain the new embedded cnf_key attribute, containing the originally submitted public key.  The resource server, can then leverage the public key to perform some out of band challenge response questions of the client, when the client comes to present the access_token later.

If using the more traditional stateful access_tokens, the RS can call the ../oauth2/introspect endpoint to find the public key.

The powerful use case is to validate the the client submitting the access_token, is in fact the same as the original recipient, when the access_token was issued.  This can help reduce MITM and other basic token misuse scenarios.

This blog post was first published @ http://www.theidentitycookbook.com/, included here with permission from the author.

OpenAM: New topic-based documentation

ForgeRock LogoOpenAM’s capabilities have grown significantly in the last few releases, with the result that even the product docs outgrew the old organization. Thanks to Chris Lee, Cristina Herraz, David Goldsmith, and Gene Hirayama, the draft docs are now arranged to make it easier to find just what you are looking for.

Instead of a guide-based doc set, what you see now are topic-oriented categories that bring you right to the features you want to use:

  • Try OpenAM (up and running quickly, ready for evaluation)
  • Access Management (authentication and single sign-on, authorization, RADIUS)
  • Federation (OAuth 2.0, OpenID Connect 1.0, SAML, STS)
  • User Services (self-registration, self-serve account and password management, self-serve sharing using UMA)
  • Installation and Maintenance (plan, install, set up, upgrade, and maintain access management services)
  • Extensibility (REST APIs, Java APIs and SPIs, C SDK)
  • Policy Agents (for enforcing policy on web sites and in Java web applications)

Each guide is written so that you find everything about a topic in one place. Are you focused on centralizing access policies for authorization? Read the Authorization Guide. Interested in granting access to account info for modern mobile and web applications using OpenID Connect? See the OpenID Connect 1.0 Guide. Participating in a federation of SAML 2 providers? Check out the SAML 2.0 Guide.

Those of you who knew the old layout intimately are probably going to wonder, “Where did you move my stuff?” In fact, there is a guide for that, too. Having Trouble Finding Something? indicates where your stuff went, with tables of correspondence from each section in the old layout to the topic in the new layout.

Great to see this leap forward towards a topic-based documentation set for OpenAM!


OpenAM: New topic-based documentation

This blog post was first published @ marginnotes2.wordpress.com, included here with permission.

OpenAM’s capabilities have grown significantly in the last few releases, with the result that even the product docs outgrew the old organization. Thanks to Chris Lee, Cristina Herraz, David Goldsmith, and Gene Hirayama, the draft docs are now arranged to make it easier to find just what you are looking for.

Instead of a guide-based doc set, what you see now are topic-oriented categories that bring you right to the features you want to use:

  • Try OpenAM (up and running quickly, ready for evaluation)
  • Access Management (authentication and single sign-on, authorization, RADIUS)
  • Federation (OAuth 2.0, OpenID Connect 1.0, SAML, STS)
  • User Services (self-registration, self-serve account and password management, self-serve sharing using UMA)
  • Installation and Maintenance (plan, install, set up, upgrade, and maintain access management services)
  • Extensibility (REST APIs, Java APIs and SPIs, C SDK)
  • Policy Agents (for enforcing policy on web sites and in Java web applications)

Each guide is written so that you find everything about a topic in one place. Are you focused on centralizing access policies for authorization? Read the Authorization Guide. Interested in granting access to account info for modern mobile and web applications using OpenID Connect? See the OpenID Connect 1.0 Guide. Participating in a federation of SAML 2 providers? Check out the SAML 2.0 Guide.

Those of you who knew the old layout intimately are probably going to wonder, “Where did you move my stuff?” In fact, there is a guide for that, too. Having Trouble Finding Something? indicates where your stuff went, with tables of correspondence from each section in the old layout to the topic in the new layout.

Great to see this leap forward towards a topic-based documentation set for OpenAM!

Identity Disorder Podcast, Episode 3

Episode 3: It’s All About The Context

identity-disorder-speakers-ep003

In this episode of the podcast, Daniel and Chris are joined by Andy Hall and Simon Moffatt from ForgeRock product management. Topics include how and why context is important in identity, the recent ForgeRock Identity Summit and Unconference in Australia, the Olympic medal counts, and how Daniel gets into his Australian accent by saying “Bondi Beach.”

Episode Links:

ForgeRock Smart City video
https://vimeo.com/153044373

ForgeRock Privacy video
https://vimeo.com/157651841

DevOps Unleashed webinar replay:
https://go.forgerock.com/DevOps-Unleashed-Webinar_OnDemand.html

ForgeRock Identity Summit in London and Paris
https://summits.forgerock.com/

All upcoming ForgeRock events:
https://www.forgerock.com/about-us/events/

Identity Disorder Podcast, Episode 2

Identity Disorder, Episode 2: It’s a DevOps World, We Just Live In It

identity-disorder-speakers-ep002

In the second episode of Identity Disorder, join Daniel and me as we chat with ForgeRock’s resident DevOps guru Warren Strange. Topics include why DevOps and elastic environments are a bit like herding cattle, how ForgeRock works in a DevOps world, more new features in the mid-year 2016 ForgeRock Identity Platform release, the Pokémon training center next to Daniel’s house, and if Canada might also consider withdrawing from its neighbors.

Episode Links:

Learn more about ForgeRock DevOps and cloud resources: https://wikis.forgerock.org/confluence/display/DC/ForgeRock+DevOps+and+Cloud+Resources

Videos of the new features in the mid-year 2016 ForgeRock Identity Platform release:
https://vimeo.com/album/4053949

Information on the 2016 Sydney Identity Summit and Sydney Identity Unconference (August 9-10, 2016):
https://summits.forgerock.com/sydney/

All upcoming ForgeRock events:
https://www.forgerock.com/about-us/events/

 

Identity Disorder Podcast, Episode 1

I’m excited to introduce a new podcast series hosted by Daniel Raskin and myself. The series will focus on (what we hope are!) interesting identity topics, news about ForgeRock, events, and much more. Take a listen to the debut episode below where we discuss why and how to get rid of passwords, how stateless OAuth2 tokens work, and some current events, too!

-Chris

ForgeRock OpenAM 13 Installation & Configuration

I was asked if I could cut a quick video on the installation and configuration for ForgeRock OpenAM 13. While I had done a similar video on an earlier version of OpenAM and that the procedure by and large remains the same, I used this opportunity to get over my laziness. Here’s the video:

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

Addendum to ForgeRock Full Stack Configuration – Using ForgeRock OpenIG

This is an extension of an earlier post that demonstrated ForgeRock Full Stack Configuration, comprising OpenDJ, OpenAM and OpenIDM. In here we’ll plug in ForgeRock OpenIG to route traffic to/from OpenAM and OpenIDM. In the video log that follows, you’ll see:

– All urls that hit OpenIG, containing a string ‘openam’ getting redirected to OpenAM URL
– All urls that hit OpenIG, that does not contain the string ‘openam’ getting redirected to:

  1. OpenAM for Authentication if there is no valid User session and then on to OpenIDM UI
  2. OpenIDM UI if there is a valid User session

So here’s the extended illustration

AddendumToFullStackConfiguration

Now on to the video.Enjoy!

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

ForgeRock OpenAM – Configuring Different Realms to Use Different BaseDNs of an OpenDJ Instance as Identity Repository

The short video log that follows was prepared to answer a question raised in the Forum on the ForgeRock Community Website. It’s an easy one on how to configure two separate BaseDNs of a single ForgeRock OpenDJ instance as Identity Repository for two separate Realms in ForgeRock OpenAM.

Enjoy!

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.