Using SAML Assertion Attributes in ForgeRock OpenAM – Episode 03/04 : Configuring Transient Federation in ForgeRock OpenAM

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

This is the third episode from a four part video made on using SAML v2 Assertion attributes in an application protected by ForgeRock OpenAM. In the interest of continuity and also to get the context accurately, it may make sense to read/view the blog posts in the following order:

1. Protecting a J2EE Application with ForgeRock OpenAM
2. Configuring Federation in ForgeRock OpenAM
3. Configuring Transient Federation in ForgeRock OpenAM
4. Using SAMLv2 Assertion Attributes

Let me throw a picture at you:

image04

The diagram is a slightly modified version of the one that you would have seen in my earlier blog entry. It has one additional user in the Identity Provider (which of course seems like a world famous detective and that’s no coincidence), but no corresponding entry in the Service Provider. In the Identity Federation Configuration earlier, we saw how a user with an id ‘demo’ in the Identity Provider linked her account with her id in the Service Provider. But there can be situations, when we may want to use Federation with identities only at the IDP, still gaining access to the applications protected by the SP. That’s where Transient Federation comes into play. It maps the identities from IDP to an anonymous user in the SP (many to one mapping).

Enjoy!

Accessing ForgeRock OpenDJ Administration GUI (OpenDJ Control Panel) from a Ubuntu Linux Container

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

You will find an entry on my blogs that talked about the installation of Linux Container and further demonstrated ForgeRock OpenDJ installation and configuration in it. In the last several days, though I posted some contents on OpenDJ, I never introduced my kind readers to the Administration GUI that the OpenDJ product comes with. That was mainly because I was struggling to get the GUI from a Linux Container. This morning I was determined more than ever before to get over this roadblock, and, boy, did manage to figure out, perhaps, one among the many ways of doing it. In the following screen-cast, you’ll see me installing VNC Server on my Linux Container (Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS) that has OpenDJ in it and then use a VNC client from the Host OS (Ubuntu 14.10) to access the OpenDJ Control Panel, a very convenient tool to browse the OpenDJ Directory data. Very soon, you’ll see me using OpenDJ control panel for a serious reason. Thank you for your patience.

ForgeRock OpenIDM: Setting Up SSL With MySQL Internal Repository

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

If you’ve already seen the video demonstration on setting up ForgeRock OpenIDM to use a JDBC repository, you may now be interested to know how to secure the traffic from ForgeRock OpenIDM to its JDBC repository. So in the video that follows, you will see:

– Setting up SSL in MySQL database

– Configuring OpenIDM to use SSLto the MySQL database (its internal repository)

Like several other videos that I’ve already published on this blog space around ForgeRock products, this one also makes use of OpenIDMwithSSLtoJDBC-01

Hope you’ll find the video log useful:

Thanks
MySQL Product Documentation
ForgeRock Documentation

Setting Up ForgeRock OpenAM with HTTPS on Tomcat

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

This post is a demo version of the ForgeRock Documentation on Setting Up OpenAM with HTTPS on Tomcat. I had earlier published a screen-cast on the ForgeRock OpenAM deployment and Configuration on a here. Below you’ll find the steps that I run in my Ubuntu Linux Container to secure our OpenAM deployment:

– Create a Certificate & store it in keystore in a Linux Container
– Modify the Tomcat Server Configuration file (server.xml) to enable SSL (on port 8443)
– Deploy ForgeRock OpenAM
– Access OpenAM from the host OS and complete the configuration

If it’s hard for your visualize how the infrastructure looks like, here’s an illustration to make life easy.

OpenAMWithSSL

Now on to the action:

If you are not able to view the embedded video, please click here