OpenIG on Docker: The Perfect Couple

This blog post was first published @ http://identityrocks.blogspot.fr/, included here with permission.

“Docker containers wrap a piece of software in a complete filesystem that contains everything needed to run […]” [1]


OpenIG (Open Identity Gateway) provides an elegant yet flexible way to integrate your applications, devices, APIs with modern identity standards such as token types, authentication and authorization. The gateway as your integration component can be deployed and scaled along the applications and services it secures.

Whilst organizations adopt containerization as part of a “well-oiled” delivery pipeline, which includes the gateway, OpenIG in a container is also very beneficial for evaluation purposes. Here’s how you can evaluate in just a couple of minutes.

As prerequisites, you need docker and git on your system.

  1. Checkout the ForgeRock docker project to retrieve the Dockerfile and sample OpenIG configuration files
  • git clone https://stash.forgerock.org/scm/docker/docker.git
  • cd docker/openig
  • Build the docker image
  • docker build -t forgerock/openig:latest .
  • Run the docker image and mount the sample-config directory from your local git copy in the container
  • docker run –detach -p 8080:8080 –volume <LOCAL_PATH_TO_GIT>/docker/openig/sample-config:/var/openig –name openig -it forgerock/openig
To test the sample configuration, point your client (e.g. web browser, curl) to http://localhost:8080/simplethrottle for instance. The response is determined by the StaticResponseHandler setting in the 20-simplethrottle.json file.
A simplified version of this procedure however without the sample configuration but not necessitating usage of git and clone the full repo goes as follows. This is well suited to evaluate the upcoming user interface.
  1. Download the Dockerfile from https://stash.forgerock.org/projects/DOCKER/repos/docker/browse/openig/Dockerfile
  2. Build the docker image (as above)
  • docker build -t forgerock/openig:latest .
  • Run the docker image
  • docker run -d -p 8080:8080 –name openig -it forgerock/openig
Other useful commands:
  • Start container: docker stop openig
  • Stop container: docker start openig
  • Get shell prompt: docker exec -i -t openig /bin/bash
  • Remove container: docker rm openig

References

[1]Package your application into a standardized unit for software development”. Retrieved from https://www.docker.com/what-docker on Sep 6th, 2016.

 

Identity Disorder Podcast, Episode 2

Identity Disorder, Episode 2: It’s a DevOps World, We Just Live In It

identity-disorder-speakers-ep002

In the second episode of Identity Disorder, join Daniel and me as we chat with ForgeRock’s resident DevOps guru Warren Strange. Topics include why DevOps and elastic environments are a bit like herding cattle, how ForgeRock works in a DevOps world, more new features in the mid-year 2016 ForgeRock Identity Platform release, the Pokémon training center next to Daniel’s house, and if Canada might also consider withdrawing from its neighbors.

Episode Links:

Learn more about ForgeRock DevOps and cloud resources: https://wikis.forgerock.org/confluence/display/DC/ForgeRock+DevOps+and+Cloud+Resources

Videos of the new features in the mid-year 2016 ForgeRock Identity Platform release:
https://vimeo.com/album/4053949

Information on the 2016 Sydney Identity Summit and Sydney Identity Unconference (August 9-10, 2016):
https://summits.forgerock.com/sydney/

All upcoming ForgeRock events:
https://www.forgerock.com/about-us/events/

 

Addendum to ForgeRock Full Stack Configuration – Using ForgeRock OpenIG

This is an extension of an earlier post that demonstrated ForgeRock Full Stack Configuration, comprising OpenDJ, OpenAM and OpenIDM. In here we’ll plug in ForgeRock OpenIG to route traffic to/from OpenAM and OpenIDM. In the video log that follows, you’ll see:

– All urls that hit OpenIG, containing a string ‘openam’ getting redirected to OpenAM URL
– All urls that hit OpenIG, that does not contain the string ‘openam’ getting redirected to:

  1. OpenAM for Authentication if there is no valid User session and then on to OpenIDM UI
  2. OpenIDM UI if there is a valid User session

So here’s the extended illustration

AddendumToFullStackConfiguration

Now on to the video.Enjoy!

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

ForgeRock OpenIG 4 As OpenAM Policy Enforcement Point

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

We know of it as a job usually done by the OpenAM Web/J2EE Policy Agent to enforce a Policy Decision sent by the Access Management Solution. To help you recollect, this is how it works:

– An End User tries to access a resource (say, a URL)
– The Web/J2EE Policy Agent deployed in the Container, intercepts the requests and redirects the request to Access Management Solution
– The Access Management Solution, first Authenticates the User, does a redirection to the the Resource (URL), where Agent would again receive it
– The Agent would now ask the Access Management Solution whether the Authenticated User has access to the Protected Resource (Authorization)
– Based on the policies defined in the Access Management Solution for the Protected Resource, it constructs a Decision and sends it back to the Agent
– Whatever the decision Agent receives from the Access Management (whether to ALLOW or DENY access to the Protected Resource), the Agent Enforces it!

The story in the video below is a bit different. In fact, the protagonist is different. The honours of Enforcing a Policy Decision sent by OpenAM is on ForgeRock OpenIG 4. As for the flow, it by and large remains what is mentioned above, just that the OpenIG uses its Route Configuration file to decide whether it should redirect the Client requests to OpenAM (should the SSO Cookie is absent in the request), ask OpenAM for Policy Decisions on Protected URLs by Authenticated Users and finally to enforce a Decision that is sent by OpenAM (whether to ALLOW or DENY access to Protected URLs).

Very roughly, here’s an illustration of the flow:

To see it in action, watch the screen-cast below. Enjoy!

Related Documentation:
ForgeRock OpenIG Documentation

ForgeRock OpenIG 4 – Getting Credentials From Database

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

To know how ForgeRock OpenIG 4 is configured to fetch User Credentials from a Database for User Authentication (a process transparent to the User), the following Video log might help. I had posted a similar video on this space earlier, but that then the User Credentials were fetched from a Flat File (CSV). The flow isn’t quite different from that, just that a Filter used by ForgeRock OpenIG in this case is different and that we should configure the OpenIG to connect to the DB.

In the video, we’ll:
– Install the H2 Database. Create ‘Users’ table and load User data in it
– Configure OpenIG (deployed in Jetty) to connect to the Database
– Prepare OpenIG Route Configuration file to fetch User Credentials (based on a Email address) and post the data to HTTP Server, who responds with the User profile page

For those whose right side of the brain is more prominent, here’s the visual representation of what is mentioned above:

OpenIGGettingCredentialsfromDB-Updated

For those who don’t want to think too much looking at the illustration below, but would like to sit back, relax and enjoy watching a show, here’s the video. Enjoy!

Related Documentation/Video
ForgeRock OpenIG Documentation
Screencast on using OpenIG 3.x to Connect to a JDBC Datastore

ForgeRock OpenIG 4 – Getting Credentials From File Datastore

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

If we’ve just moved ahead of ‘Getting Started with OpenIG 4‘, the following screen-cast might of some interest. In fact, this is a remake of a video that’s posted here, which was based on now older version of ForgeRock OpenIG.

So what’s in the video here? We’ve a CSV file with some User details. A user tries to access a URI, which hits OpenIG, who by using some Route Configuration files, looks up User Credentials from the CSV file and posts it to the HTTP Server, to get a User Profile Page (Post Authentication Landing Page) in return. So the Client, without having to go through the inconvenience of supplying his/her User Credentials, gets the Post Authentication Landing Page from the HTTP Server. See, if my attempt to capture the flow below makes sense.

ForgeRock OpenIG 4 - Getting Credentials from File Datastore

If that didn’t make your life easy, hopefully the demonstration in the video will. Enjoy!

Related Documentation/ Video:
ForgeRock OpenIG Documentation
ForgeRock OpenIG 3.x – Getting Credentials from File Datastore

Getting Started with ForgeRock OpenIG 4

This blog post was first published @ www.fedji.com, included here with permission.

If you haven’t gotten started with the newer version of ForgeRock OpenIG, the following Video might be of some help. I’ve done this before, but using now an older version of the Product. So if you are familiar with that, then this gives you an assurance that everything continues to work as before, and that there is more to it (that’s a story for another day though). So if you haven’t gotten your hands dirty with ForgeRock’s Identity Gateway solution, I invite you to have a look at it, and everything that you may need to get started with it, you will find it in the video below.

Very quickly, let me tell what’s done in the Screen-cast:

– Install Jetty
– Deploy ForgeRock OpenIG in Jetty
– Install Minimal HTTP Server
– Configure ForgeRock OpenIG to post user Credentials to the HTTP Server to return a User Profile Page (so the authentication process is transparent to the user.

Please note that the practice of hard-coding the User Credential is something that you’ll probably never see in a real world scenario, but of course the intent here is only to get a rough idea of what the OpenIG can do. The illustration below might give you a decent idea on the flow:

GettingStartedWithOpenIG4

The video, I’m confident, will make it more clear.Enjoy!

Related Documentation/Video:
ForgeRock OpenIG Documentation
ForgeRock OpenIG (3.x) Installation and Configuration in a Linux Container

OpenIG 3.1 is now available…

It’s my great pleasure to announce the general availability of OpenIG 3.1, a minor update of the ForgeRock Open Identity Gateway product, following the press release of early December.

The Open Identity Gateway is a simple standard-based solution to secure access to web applications and APIs. It supports SAMLv2, OAuth 2.0, OpenID Connect and can capture and replay credentials, enabling SSO and Federation.

With a four months release cycle since the previous release, OpenIG 3.1 doesn’t contain many major new features, but it does bring several new enhancements to the product, including :

  • The support for encrypted JSON Web Token (JWT) cookies to store session information on the user-agent. The administrator can decide to keep the default container managed sessions, or use JWT cookies globally or for a specific route.
  • A simplification of OpenIG configuration, with the ability to inline objects, omit specific fields when empty or obvious. This simplification enables faster configuration as well as a better readability for long term maintenance of the service.
  • IMG_4090The introduction of “Decorator” for configuration objects, easily adding new behaviors to existing configured objects. OpenIG 3.1 provides 3 decorators out of the box: a CaptureDecorator that enables debugging and logging in a much easier and more dynamic way; a TimerDecorator that records times spent in the decorated objects; an AuditDecorator that allows to audit operations for any decorated objects.
  • The support for a sample monitoring handler that provides basic statistics about the exchanges and routes. The monitoring information can be used to provide an activity dashboard such as here on the right..
  • Some optimisations and performance improvements when using OpenID Connect and OAuth 2.0

For the complete details of the changes in OpenIG 3.1, please check the release notes.

You can download the ForgeRock product here. It’s been heavily tested by our Quality Assurance team : functional tests on Windows, Mac and Linux, stress tests as proxy, with OAuth2 and OpenID Connect, non-regression tests… The documentation has been entirely reviewed and all examples tested.  The  source code is available in our code repository (https://svn.forgerock.org/openig).

We are interested in your feedback, so get it, play with it and give us your comments, either on the mailing list, the wiki, the OpenIG Forum or through blog posts.

 


Filed under: Identity Gateway Tagged: API, authentication, authorization, ForgeRock, gateway, identity, identity gateway, openig, opensource, release

New features in OpenIG 3.1: Statistics

OpenIGOpenIG 3.1 is almost out the doors… Just a few days of testing and it will be generally available.

The new version introduces a general purpose auditing framework, and some basic monitoring capabilities. Mark wrote a blog post describing the details of the auditing framework and the monitoring endpoint. I’ve started playing with it for demonstration purposes and wanted to get more out of it.

If you want to expose the monitoring endpoint, you need to add the following 00-monitor.json file under .openig/config/routes/ and decorate a few handlers as Mark describes in his post. You might also want to extend this configuration to require authentication and avoid letting anyone have access to it.

The monitoring endpoint allows to display basic statistics about the different routes: the counts of in progress requests, completed requests and failures. So the output looks like this:

{"Users":{"in progress":0,"completed":6,"internal errors":0},
 "main":{"in progress":1,"completed":1074,"internal errors":0},
 "groups":{"in progress":0,"completed":4,"internal errors":0},
 "Default":{"in progress":0,"completed":16,"internal errors":0},
 "monitor":{"in progress":1,"completed":1048,"internal errors":0}
}

Each tag represents a route in OpenIG, including the “monitor” one,  “main” representing the sum of all routes.

I was thinking about a better way to visualise the statistics and came up with the idea of a monitoring console. A few lines of Javascript, using JQuery and Bootstrap, an additional configuration file for OpenIG and here’s the result:

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 13.15.18

As you can see, this adds a new endpoint with its own audit: /openig/Console. The endpoint can be protected like any other route using OAuth2.0, OpenID Connect, SAML or basic authentication.

Let’s look at what I’ve done.

I’ve added a new route under ~/.openig/config/routes: 00-console.json with a single StaticResponseHandler. Instead of adding the whole content in the json file, I’ve decided to let the handler load the whole content from a file (named console.html). This allows me to separate the logic from the content.

00-console.json

{
    "handler":{
        "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
        "config" : {
            "status": 200,
            "entity": "${read('/Users/ludo/.openig/config/routes/console.html')}"
        }
    },
    "condition": "${exchange.request.method == 'GET'
        and exchange.request.uri.path == '/openig/Console'}",
    "audit" : "Console"
}

Note that if you are copying the 00-console.json file, you will need to edit the file location to match the absolute path of your console.html file.

Now the console.html file is actually a little bit long to display here. But you can download it here.

But it’s a basic html page, which loads Jquery and Bootstrap:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="//maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.0/css/bootstrap.min.css">
<!-- Optional theme -->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.1/css/bootstrap-theme.min.css">
<!-- Latest compiled and minified JavaScript -->
<script src="//code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.1.min.js"></script>
...

And at regular interval (default is 3 seconds), it gets the statistics from the monitoring endpoint, and displays them as a table:

...
<script>
$(document).ready(function () {
    setInterval(function () {
        $.get("/openig/monitor").success(writeRoutesStats);
    }, 3000);
});
...

The whole Console fits within 60 lines of html and javascript, including some logic to use different colours when internal errors occur on a route.

Finally, the nice thing about the Console, being based on BootStrap, it also has responsive design and allows me to monitor my OpenIG instance from anywhere, including my phone:IMG_4090

If you do install the Console on your instance of OpenIG 3.1 (or one of the latest nightly builds), please send me a screenshot. And if you do customize the javascript for an even nicer look and feel, don’t hesitate to send a pull request.


Filed under: Identity Gateway Tagged: console, dashboard, ForgeRock, identity gateway, monitoring, openig, opensource

On track for the release…

Yesterday we’ve announced the new releases of 3 of ForgeRock products : OpenAM 12.0, OpenIDM 3.1 and OpenIG 3.1.

There are still a few days before we make OpenIG 3.1 generally available. We are currently stressing it out and reviewing the documentation. But all indicators are green for now :

Snapshot of OpenIG Issue Tracker


Filed under: Identity Gateway Tagged: ForgeRock, identity, identity gateway, IRM, openig, release